Our Projects

Our Projects

PowerBridge’s flagship projects are the Neptune Regional Transmission System, completed in 2007, and the Hudson Transmission Project, completed in 2013.  Both are underwater cable projects that were completed on budget and ahead of schedule.  Two other underwater cable projects, West Point and GreenLine, are in development.  In addition, PowerBridge is selectively evaluating a portfolio of potential energy and infrastructure projects that are an appropriate fit for our capabilities and expertise.

NEPTUNE

The Neptune Project is a 660-MW (500 kV) high-voltage, direct current (HVDC) submarine electric transmission cable, completed in 2007, that connects power generation resources in the PJM system to electricity consumers on Long Island.  The cable extends from the First Energy substation in Sayreville, New Jersey to the Long Island Power Authority Newbridge Road substation in Levittown, Long Island, a distance of 65 miles.

Converter stations are located at Sayreville and at Duffy Avenue on Long Island.  The majority of the route – more than 50 miles — is underwater in the New York Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean; 14 miles are buried in the existing right-of-way of the Wantagh State Parkway. The Project was completed in the summer of 2007, ahead of schedule and within budget.

In May 2004, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) chose the Neptune cable as the centerpiece of its long-range plan to provide approximately 1000 MW of new, urgently needed power sources to Long Island by 2010.  Because the cable is a transmission connection to the PJM system, it increases the capacity and energy available to Long Island in a more flexible and reliable manner than simply siting new generating facilities on Long Island.  Moreover, it saves Long Island ratepayers money, adds capacity and makes available more (and diverse sources of) energy without adding local impacts associated with new power generation.

HUDSON

The Hudson Transmission Project is a 660 MW electric transmission link between New York City and PJM Interconnection that was completed in June of 2013.  While its main purpose is to provide a new source of electric power for the New York City customers of the New York Power Authority (NYPA), the Project also provides New York City with access to renewable resources throughout PJM and includes very significant upgrades and reinforcements to the transmission system in New Jersey.

The Hudson transmission line is entirely underground and underwater, using HVDC technology.  The route begins in Ridgefield, New Jersey, the site of a new converter station, where it interconnects with the PJM system at a PSE&G substation.  The line follows existing railroad rights-of-way, through an inactive railroad tunnel to the edge of the Hudson River in Edgewater.  It is then buried beneath the Hudson for approximately three miles to a landfall point near Pier 92 in Manhattan.  The final half-mile of cable is routed beneath the West Side Highway and ultimately into the ConEd W. 49th Street Substation.

The Hudson Transmission Project was conceived in response to a public solicitation by NYPA in the spring of 2005 by which NYPA requested proposals for the supply of 500 MW of electric power capacity for its customers in New York City.  Hudson Transmission Partners, LLC (HTP) responded with its proposal to provide a minimum of 500 MW of firm transmission capacity via an underground-and-underwater link to the PJM system.  The proposal was selected by NYPA in 2006.  Construction on the project began in May 2011 and was completed in June 2013, ahead of schedule.

WEST POINT

West Point Transmission is a proposed underwater and underground electric transmission system that will bring up to 1,000 MW of electric power from northern and western New York to the greater New York city load center. Envisioned as a key element in New York’s Energy Highway initiative, West Point will help provide new, diverse energy sources for the New York City metro area and create many new jobs as well as power plant development opportunities upstate. West Point Transmission starts in Athens, New York and follows the Hudson River approximately 75 miles south, to end in Buchanan, New York, the location of Indian Point Energy Center. It will tie into existing transmission infrastructure to the north, west, and south, without the need for intrusive new facilities between Buchanan and the New York City area.

West Point Transmission is in the development phase, with major permit applications submitted to the New York State Public Service Commission and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  Routing, environmental, and technical studies have been completed. The West Point Transmission cables will be installed underneath the Hudson River, avoiding permanent impacts to environmentally sensitive areas. Land-based portions of the cable route will be buried underground.

GREEN LINE

The Green Line Project is an undersea electric transmission line proposed to move at least 800 MW of power from Maine to Southern New England.  Its goals are to encourage the development of renewable resources in northern New England by providing the necessary infrastructure to bring “green” power to more densely populated areas to the south, including the Boston area, while at the same time increasing the supply of reliable energy into the largest demand center in New England.

The New England states can only meet their expanding renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) goals by substantially expanding the New England transmission grid. Energy efficiency, demand side management, and renewable energy generation projects in southern New England will help to achieve those goals, but the bulk of the new renewable supply resources will have to come from Maine and eastern Canada, where the greatest potential exists for renewable energy development in the form of wind, biomass, tidal, and hydro-electric power.

Green Line will enable New England to meet its RPS and RGGI goals in a reliable, economic, and environmentally benign manner by bypassing congestion that now exists on the existing overhead transmission lines between northern and southern New England.